Other Common Lung Tumors Presenting as SPNs

Most malignant SPNs primary in the lung are adenocarcinomas. The following images, in descending order of frequency [1], show examples of other primary lung malignancies presenting as SPNs. Give diagnosis, histologic criteria, and corroborative special stains for each tumor.

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

Figure 3.

Figure 4.

Figure 5.

Answers

Reference

Siegelman S, Khouri N, Leo F, Fishman E, Braverman R, Zerhouni E. Solitary pulmonary nodules: CT assessment. Radiology 1986:160:307-312. Abstract

Return to Pathologic Diagnoses

TOP--Rad/Path Home Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.

Squamous Carcinoma

Intercellular bridges (desmosomes) in left nest and a keratin pearl in right nest are present.

2.

Large Cell Carcinoma

Squamous or glandular differentiation is absent. Staining for neutral mucin (PAS-D) to indicate glandular differentiation was negative.

3.

Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma

Tumor cells line alveolar walls. Note that the tumor cells here are larger and more hyperchromatic than the normal bronchiolar epithelium of the airway at the lower left.

4.

Small Cell Carcinoma

Hyperchromatic cells show nuclear molding because of very high nuclear-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratios, and nucleoli are generally absent. Mitotic rate is high. A stain for chromogranin A was positive indicating a neurosecretory cell type.

5.

Carcinoid Tumor

The tumor has a trabecular pattern of cells with low N/C ratios, finely granular chromatin (not well shown here), and rare mitotic figures. A stain for chromogranin A was positive indicating a neurosecretory cell type.

Return to TOP